The Seattle Times. Winner of Eight Pulitzer Prizes.


Tue, Sep 23, 2014

WEATHER | TRAFFIC

VIEW SECTIONS

Home


Updated Wednesday, January 30, 2013 at 10:31 PM

Birth-control issue likely destined for U.S. Supreme Court

By ETHAN BRONNER
The New York Times

In a flood of lawsuits, Roman Catholics, evangelicals and Mennonites are challenging a provision in the new health-care law that requires employers to cover birth control in employee health plans — a high-stakes clash between religious freedom and health-care access that appears headed to the Supreme Court.

In recent months, federal courts have seen dozens of lawsuits brought by religious institutions such as Catholic dioceses and by private employers ranging from a pizza mogul to produce transporters who say the government is forcing them to violate core tenets of their faith. Some suits have been turned away by judges convinced that access to contraception is a vital health need and a compelling state interest. Others have been told their beliefs appear to outweigh any state interest and that they may hold off complying with the law until their cases have been judged. New suits are filed nearly weekly.

“This is highly likely to end up at the Supreme Court,” said Douglas Laycock, a law professor at the University of Virginia and one of the country’s top scholars on church-state conflicts. “There are so many cases, and we are already getting strong disagreements among the circuit courts.”

President Obama’s health-care law, the Affordable Care Act, was the most fought-over piece of legislation in his first term and was the focus of a highly contentious Supreme Court decision last year that found it to be constitutional.

Full coverage at issue

But a provision requiring the full coverage of contraception remains a matter of controversy. The law says companies must fully cover all “contraceptive methods and sterilization procedures” approved by the Food and Drug Administration, including “morning-after pills” and intrauterine devices whose effects some contend are akin to abortion.

As applied by the Health and Human Services Department, the law offers an exemption for “religious employers,” meaning those who meet these criteria: their purpose is to inculcate religious values, they primarily employ and serve people who share their religious tenets, and they are nonprofit groups under federal tax law.

But many institutions, including religious schools and colleges, do not meet those criteria because they employ and teach members of other religions and have a broader purpose than inculcating religious values.

“We represent a Catholic college founded by Benedictine monks,” said Kyle Duncan, general counsel of the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, which has brought a number of the cases to court. “They don’t qualify as a house of worship and don’t turn away people in hiring or as students because they are not Catholic.”

In that case, involving Belmont Abbey College in North Carolina, a federal appeals-court panel in Washington, D.C., told the college last month it could hold off on complying with the law while the federal government works on a promised exemption for religiously-affiliated institutions. The court told the government it wanted an update by mid-February.

Defenders of the provision say employers may not be permitted to impose their views on employees, especially when something so central as health care is concerned. “Ninety-nine percent of women use contraceptives at some time in their lives,” said Judy Waxman, a vice president of the National Women’s Law Center, which filed a brief supporting the government in one of the cases. “There is a strong and legitimate government interest because it affects the health of women and babies.”

She added, referring to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Contraception was declared by the CDC to be one of the 10 greatest public-health achievements of the 20th century.”

Officials at the departments of Justice and Health and Human Services declined to comment, saying the cases were pending.

Compromise possible

A compromise for religious institutions may be worked out. The government hopes that by placing the burden on insurance companies rather than on the organizations, the objections will be overcome. Even more challenging cases involve private companies run by people who reject all or many forms of contraception.

The Alliance Defending Freedom, a conservative group, has brought a case on behalf of Hercules Industries, a company based in Denver that makes sheet-metal products. It was granted an injunction by a judge in Colorado who said the religious values of the family owners were infringed by the law.

“Two-thirds of the cases have had injunctions against Obamacare, and most are headed to courts of appeals,” said Matt Bowman, senior legal counsel for the alliance. “It is clear that a substantial number of these cases will vindicate religious freedom over Obamacare. But it seems likely that the Supreme Court will ultimately resolve the dispute.”

One of the biggest cases involves Hobby Lobby, which started as a picture-framing shop in an Oklahoma City garage with $600 and is now one of the country’s largest arts-and-crafts retailers, with more than 500 stores in 41 states.

David Green, the company’s founder, is an evangelical Christian who says he runs his company on biblical principles, including closing Sunday so employees can be with their families, paying nearly double the minimum wage and providing employees with comprehensive health insurance.

Green does not object to covering contraception but considers morning-after pills to be abortion-inducing and therefore wrong.

“Our family is now being forced to choose between following the laws of the land that we love or maintaining the religious beliefs that have made our business successful and have supported our family and thousands of our employees and their families,” Green said in a statement. “We simply cannot abandon our religious beliefs to comply with this mandate.”

The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals last month turned down his family’s request for a preliminary injunction, but the company has found a legal way to delay compliance for some months.


, 2012
President Obama and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius after Obama announced a revamp to the contraception policy, a change that failed to mollify some opponents of the mandate.




SECTIONS

Top News arrow

Latest News arrow

Local arrow

Nation & World arrow

Business & Technology arrow

Editorial & Opinion arrow

Sports arrow

Entertainment arrow

Living arrow

Travel & Outdoors arrow

Obituaries arrow


CLASSIFIEDS

Jobs arrow

Autos arrow

Homes & Rentals arrow

More Classifieds arrow