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Updated Thursday, December 13, 2012 at 11:10 AM

Son’s lack of job frustrates family members | Dear Carolyn

By Carolyn Hax
Syndicated columnist

DEAR CAROLYN: Since he graduated from college four years ago, my son has been drifting among friends and family but mostly staying with his cousin and his wife.

My son is searching for his dream job and shows signs of pursuing that dream but basically doesn’t work. I try not to feel ashamed, but it really bothers me.

My brother and sister-and-law always find ways to make comments about the situation. I have pleaded with my son to get a job and get out of my nephew’s home, and I have asked my nephew to put my son out. Although he also rails at my son, he won’t ask him to leave. It’s as though they enjoy taunting us with this.

I don’t have a close relationship with my son because I still “parent” him. I suggest, I gently nudge, I speak outright, etc.

How do I get through holiday gatherings with my chin up?

— Bummed Out

DEAR BUMMED: If it makes you feel better, you aren’t alone in your over-involvement in the younger generation’s problems — how is this your brother’s business?

Let’s dissect: Your son is staying with his cousin and job hunting without much conviction; your nephew and his wife are housing your son; you’re suggesting, speaking outright, pleading, etc.; your brother and sister-in-law are commenting and taunting.

By my count, the youngers are the ones doing, and the elders are merely talking.

As adults themselves, your son and nephew are free to perpetuate this awkward residential farce as long as their taste for it endures.

You, too, are free to keep talking — but nothing you and your brother say is making any difference, except to keep the bad feelings in constant circulation.

To stay cool through holiday harping, keep this chain of responsibility in mind: You aren’t your son, don’t control your son, can’t re-raise your son, and can’t change how anyone deals with your son. So when anyone tries to use him against you, make the point (firmly, not flippantly) that no matter how hard you pull the strings, your son’s arms don’t move.

Maybe you did over-raise him into this paralysis — assuming that’s the implication here — but who appointed your brother to audit your parenting mistakes? Stop pining for the outcome that will impress others; I can think of no finer example for your son.

DEAR CAROLYN: My husband and I have two adolescent children and we are good friends with a couple who also have two adolescent kids. We consider their children extremely rude, entitled and very disrespectful of their own parents and, over the years, to us as well.

Last night at our house, while having dinner, the daughter told her dad to “shut up.” Nothing was said by either parent. This is just the latest misbehavior that my own children witnesseed.

I feel as if we could never reprimand their kids without jeopardizing our friendship. Is it ever OK to say something to the kids? Only if they directly insult or disrespect us?

— Anonymous

DEAR ANONYMOUS: We all make calculations (or should) before speaking up about other people’s behavior, about the severity of the problem, the efficacy of addressing it, the standing we have to intervene, and the possible unintended consequences of stepping in.

Biting your tongue just to keep these friends strikes me as a cop-out, a what’s-in-it-for-me? expediency when there’s a question of right and wrong to be answered. “Shut up” is so hostile and so inappropriate, and your dinner table is so plainly your turf, that I believe it would have been worth the friendship risk to say, calmly, “Stella, I ask that you don’t use that expression at our table. Thank you.” Let the biscuits fall where they may.

Email Carolyn at tellme@washpost.com and follow her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/carolyn.hax. Find her columns daily at www.seattletimes.com/living


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